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Ada's Ideas

The Story of Ada Lovelace, the World's First Computer Programmer
Audiobook

Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) was the daughter of Lord Byron, a poet, and Anna Isabella Milbanke, a mathematician. Her parents separated when she was young, and her mother insisted on a logic-focused education, rejecting Byron's mad love of poetry. But Ada remained fascinated with her father and considered mathematics poetical science. Via her friendship with inventor Charles Babbage, she became involved in programming his Analytical Engine, a precursor to the computer, thus becoming the world's first computer programmer. This picture book biography of Ada Lovelace is a compelling portrait of a woman who saw the potential for numbers to make art.


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Publisher: Dreamscape Media, LLC
Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781520049595
  • File size: 7321 KB
  • Release date: November 22, 2016
  • Duration: 00:15:14

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781520049595
  • File size: 7321 KB
  • Release date: November 22, 2016
  • Duration: 00:15:15
  • Number of parts: 1


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Formats

OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

Languages

English

Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) was the daughter of Lord Byron, a poet, and Anna Isabella Milbanke, a mathematician. Her parents separated when she was young, and her mother insisted on a logic-focused education, rejecting Byron's mad love of poetry. But Ada remained fascinated with her father and considered mathematics poetical science. Via her friendship with inventor Charles Babbage, she became involved in programming his Analytical Engine, a precursor to the computer, thus becoming the world's first computer programmer. This picture book biography of Ada Lovelace is a compelling portrait of a woman who saw the potential for numbers to make art.


Expand title description text